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易經
the Hexagrams, Index

In case you like to read a specific hexagram, then use this idex page.

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het Hexagrammenboek

In case you prefer to ask a question or if you like to read a specific hexagram, then use this idex.






Table 1,

Select a hexagram by combining the trigrams:


Trigrammemindeling
Trigrammemindeling


Table 2,

Select a hexagram from the drop-down list.
The hexagrams are ordered by number:








噬嗑

21. Shi He

Biting Through



<
上九:何校灭耳,凶。

Nine at the top means:

His neck is fastened in the wooden cangue,

So that his ears disappear.

Misfortune.



In contrast to the first line, this line refers to a man who is incorrigible. His punishment is the wooden cangue, and his ears disappear under it-that is to say, he is deaf to warnings. This obstinacy leads to misfortune.
the yellow circle is indicating this line as the governing ruler of the hexagram
六五:噬乾肉,得黄金,贞厉,无咎。

Six in the fifth place means:

Bites on dried lean meat.
Receives yellow gold.
Perseveringly aware of danger.
No blame.



The case to be decided is indeed not easy but perfectly clear. Since we naturally incline to leniency, we must make every effort to be like yellow gold-that is, as true as gold and as impartial as yellow, the color of the middle [the mean]. It is only by remaining conscious of the dangers growing out of the responsibility we have assumed that we can avoid making mistakes.
九四:噬乾胏,得金矢,利艰贞,吉。

Nine in the fourth place means:

Bites on dried gristly meat.
Receives metal arrows.

It furthers one to be mindful of difficulties
And to be persevering.
Good fortune.



There are great obstacles to be overcome, powerful opponents are to be punished. Though this is arduous, the effort succeeds. But it is necessary to be hard as metal and straight as an arrow to surmount the difficulties. If one knows these difficulties and remains persevering, he attains good fortune. The difficult task is achieved in the end.
六三:噬腊肉,遇毒;小吝,无咎。

Six in the third place means:

Bites on old dried meat
And strikes on something poisonous.
Slight humiliation. No blame.



Punishment is to be carried out by someone who lacks the power and authority to do so. Therefore the culprits do not submit. The matter at issue is an old one-as symbolized by salted game-and in dealing with it difficulties arise. This old meat is spoiled: by taking up the problem the punisher arouses poisonous hatred against himself, and n this way is put in a somewhat humiliating position. But since punishment was required by the time, he remains free of blame.
六二:噬肤灭鼻,无咎。

Six in the second place means:

Bites through tender meat,
So that his nose disappears.
No blame.



It is easy to discriminate between right and wrong in this case;it is like biting through tender meat. But one encounters ahardened sinner, and, aroused by anger, one goes a little toofar. The disappearance of the nose in the course of the bitesignifies that indignation blots out finer sensibility. However,there is no great harm in this, because the penalty as such is just.
初九:屦校灭趾,无咎。

Nine at the beginning means:

His feet are fastened in the stocks,
So that his toes disappear.
No blame.



If a sentence is imposed the first time a man attempts to do wrong, the penalty is a mild one. Only the toes are put in the stocks. This prevents him from sinning further and thus he becomes free of blame. It is a warning to halt in time on the path of evil.
the Sign of hexagram Biting Through Eis:

the primary trigrams:
   above Trigram Li , the Clinging, the fire
   below Trigram Zhen , the Arousing, the thunder

the nuclear trigrams:
   above Trigram Kan , the Abysmal, the water
   below Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain

the enveloping trigrams:
   above Trigram Li , the Clinging, the fire
   below Trigram Li , the Clinging, the fire

This hexagram represents an open mouth (cf. hexagram 27) with an obstruction (in the fourth place) between the teeth. As a result the lips cannot meet. To bring them together one must bite energetically through the obstacle. Since the hexagram is made up of the trigrams for thunder and for lightning, it indicates how obstacles are forcibly removed in nature.
Energetic biting through overcomes the obstacle that prevents joining of the lips; the storm with its thunder and lightning overcomes the disturbing tension in nature. Recourse to law and penalties overcomes the disturbances of harmonious social life caused by criminals and slanderers. The theme of this hexagram is a criminal lawsuit, in contradistinction to that of Sung, Conflict (hexagram 6), which refers to civil suits.

The sequence:
When there is something that can be contemplated, there is something that creates union. Hence there follows the hexagram of Biting Through. Biting through means union.

Miscellaneous notes:
Biting Through means consuming.

Appended judgments:
When the sun stood at midday, the Divine Husbandman held a market. He caused the people of the earth to come together and collected the wares of the earth. They exchanged these with one another, then returned home, and each thing found its place. Probably he took this from the hexagram of Biting Through.

The hexagram is here explained in the light of the meaning of the two trigrams Li and Zhen. Li represents the sun high above, while Zhen represents the turmoil of the market below. The inner structure of the hexagram is by no means as favorable as the outer form might lead one to conclude. It is true that clarity and movement are present, but between them, as opposing elements, there stand the nuclear trigrams Kan, danger, and Gen, Keeping Still - both formed by reason of the one fateful line in the fourth place.
the Judgement for hexagram Biting Through Eis:

噬嗑:亨。利用狱。

Biting Through has success.
It is favorable to let justice be administered.



When an obstacle to union arises, energetic biting through brings success. This is true in all situations. Whenever unity cannot be established, the obstruction is due to a talebearer and traitor who is interfering and blocking the way. To prevent permanent injury, vigorous measures must be taken at once. Deliberate obstruction of this sort does not vanish of its own accord. Judgment and punishment are required to deter or obviate it.
However, it is important to proceed in the right way. The hexagram combines Li, clarity, and Zhen, excitement. Li is yielding, Zhen is hard. Unqualified hardness and excitement would be too violent in meting out punishment; unqualified clarity and gentleness would be too weak. The two together create the just measure. It is of moment that the man who makes the decisions (represented by the fifth line) is gentle by nature, while he commands respect by his conduct in his position.

Commentary on the Decision:

噬嗑:亨。利用狱。颐中有物,曰噬嗑,噬嗑而亨。刚柔分,动而明,雷电合而章。柔得中而上行,虽不当位,利用狱也。

There is something between the corners of the mouth. This is called Biting Through.
“Biting Through, and moreover, success.” For firm and yielding are distinct from each other.Movement and clarity. Thunder and lightning are united and form lines. The yielding receives the place of honor and goes upward.
Although it is not in the appropriate place, it is favorable to let justice be administered.



The name of the hexagram is here explained on the basis of its structure. The top line and the lowest are the jaws. The nine in the fourth place stands between the two as an obstacle to be removed by biting through. This points to the necessity of using force. The firm yang lines and the yielding yin lines are clearly set apart one from the other, without falling asunder. This is the substance of the hexagram. In the same way, innocence and guilt are clearly distinguishable in the eyes of a just judge.
Movement is the attribute of Zhen, clarity that of Li; both tend upwards, thus uniting and forming clearly visible lines. The movements are separate, the coming together occurs in the heavens, whereupon the line of the lightning appears.
The ruler of the hexagram is yielding by nature, a quality desirable in legal proceedings, because it prevents cruelty. However, this yielding quality is compensated by the firmness of the place, hence does not turn into weakness.
the Image going with hexagram Biting Through Eis:

雷电噬嗑;先王以明罚敕法。

Thunder and lighting:
The image of Biting Through.
Thus the kings of former times made firm the laws
Through clearly defined penalties.



Penalties are the individual applications of the law. The lawsspecify the penalties. Clarity prevails when mild and severepenalties are differentiated, according to the nature of the crimes.This is symbolized by the clarity of lighting. The law is strengthenedby a just application of penalties. This is symbolized by the terrorof thunder. This clarity and severity have the effect of instillingrespect; it is not that the penalties are ends in themselves.The obstructions in the social life of man increase when there is alack of clarity in the penal codes and slackness in executing them.The only to strengthen the law is to make it clear and make penaltiescertain and swift.




the nuclear hexagram:

39. Jian
Obstruction

4
the Sign:

the primary trigrams:
   above Trigram Li , the Clinging, the fire
   below Trigram Zhen , the Arousing, the thunder

the nuclear trigrams:
   above Trigram Kan , the Abysmal, the water
   below Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain

the enveloping trigrams:
   above Trigram Li , the Clinging, the fire
   below Trigram Li , the Clinging, the fire

This hexagram represents an open mouth (cf. hexagram 27) with an obstruction (in the fourth place) between the teeth. As a result the lips cannot meet. To bring them together one must bite energetically through the obstacle. Since the hexagram is made up of the trigrams for thunder and for lightning, it indicates how obstacles are forcibly removed in nature.
Energetic biting through overcomes the obstacle that prevents joining of the lips; the storm with its thunder and lightning overcomes the disturbing tension in nature. Recourse to law and penalties overcomes the disturbances of harmonious social life caused by criminals and slanderers. The theme of this hexagram is a criminal lawsuit, in contradistinction to that of Sung, Conflict (hexagram 6), which refers to civil suits.

The sequence:
When there is something that can be contemplated, there is something that creates union. Hence there follows the hexagram of Biting Through. Biting through means union.

Miscellaneous notes:
Biting Through means consuming.

Appended judgments:
When the sun stood at midday, the Divine Husbandman held a market. He caused the people of the earth to come together and collected the wares of the earth. They exchanged these with one another, then returned home, and each thing found its place. Probably he took this from the hexagram of Biting Through.
 
The hexagram is here explained in the light of the meaning of the two trigrams Li and Zhen. Li represents the sun high above, while Zhen represents the turmoil of the market below. The inner structure of the hexagram is by no means as favorable as the outer form might lead one to conclude. It is true that clarity and movement are present, but between them, as opposing elements, there stand the nuclear trigrams Kan, danger, and Gen, Keeping Still - both formed by reason of the one fateful line in the fourth place.


the Judgement:

噬嗑:亨。利用狱。

Biting Through has success.
It is favorable to let justice be administered.



When an obstacle to union arises, energetic biting through brings success. This is true in all situations. Whenever unity cannot be established, the obstruction is due to a talebearer and traitor who is interfering and blocking the way. To prevent permanent injury, vigorous measures must be taken at once. Deliberate obstruction of this sort does not vanish of its own accord. Judgment and punishment are required to deter or obviate it.
However, it is important to proceed in the right way. The hexagram combines Li, clarity, and Zhen, excitement. Li is yielding, Zhen is hard. Unqualified hardness and excitement would be too violent in meting out punishment; unqualified clarity and gentleness would be too weak. The two together create the just measure. It is of moment that the man who makes the decisions (represented by the fifth line) is gentle by nature, while he commands respect by his conduct in his position.

Commentary on the Decision:

噬嗑:亨。利用狱。颐中有物,曰噬嗑,噬嗑而亨。刚柔分,动而明,雷电合而章。柔得中而上行,虽不当位,利用狱也。

There is something between the corners of the mouth. This is called Biting Through.
“Biting Through, and moreover, success.” For firm and yielding are distinct from each other.
Movement and clarity. Thunder and lightning are united and form lines. The yielding receives the place of honor and goes upward.
Although it is not in the appropriate place, it is favorable to let justice be administered.
 


The name of the hexagram is here explained on the basis of its structure. The top line and the lowest are the jaws. The nine in the fourth place stands between the two as an obstacle to be removed by biting through. This points to the necessity of using force. The firm yang lines and the yielding yin lines are clearly set apart one from the other, without falling asunder. This is the substance of the hexagram. In the same way, innocence and guilt are clearly distinguishable in the eyes of a just judge.
Movement is the attribute of Zhen, clarity that of Li; both tend upwards, thus uniting and forming clearly visible lines. The movements are separate, the coming together occurs in the heavens, whereupon the line of the lightning appears.
The ruler of the hexagram is yielding by nature, a quality desirable in legal proceedings, because it prevents cruelty. However, this yielding quality is compensated by the firmness of the place, hence does not turn into weakness.


the Image:

雷电噬嗑;先王以明罚敕法。

Thunder and lighting:
The image of Biting Through.
Thus the kings of former times made firm the laws
Through clearly defined penalties.



Penalties are the individual applications of the law. The lawsspecify the penalties. Clarity prevails when mild and severepenalties are differentiated, according to the nature of the crimes.This is symbolized by the clarity of lighting. The law is strengthenedby a just application of penalties. This is symbolized by the terrorof thunder. This clarity and severity have the effect of instillingrespect; it is not that the penalties are ends in themselves.The obstructions in the social life of man increase when there is alack of clarity in the penal codes and slackness in executing them.The only to strengthen the law is to make it clear and make penaltiescertain and swift.


the Lines:


上九:何校灭耳,凶。

Nine at the top means:

His neck is fastened in the wooden cangue,

So that his ears disappear.

Misfortune.



In contrast to the first line, this line refers to a man who is incorrigible. His punishment is the wooden cangue, and his ears disappear under it-that is to say, he is deaf to warnings. This obstinacy leads to misfortune.


the yellow circle is indicating this line as the governing ruler of the hexagram
六五:噬乾肉,得黄金,贞厉,无咎。

Six in the fifth place means:

Bites on dried lean meat.
Receives yellow gold.
Perseveringly aware of danger.
No blame.



The case to be decided is indeed not easy but perfectly clear. Since we naturally incline to leniency, we must make every effort to be like yellow gold-that is, as true as gold and as impartial as yellow, the color of the middle [the mean]. It is only by remaining conscious of the dangers growing out of the responsibility we have assumed that we can avoid making mistakes.


九四:噬乾胏,得金矢,利艰贞,吉。

Nine in the fourth place means:

Bites on dried gristly meat.
Receives metal arrows.

It furthers one to be mindful of difficulties
And to be persevering.
Good fortune.



There are great obstacles to be overcome, powerful opponents are to be punished. Though this is arduous, the effort succeeds. But it is necessary to be hard as metal and straight as an arrow to surmount the difficulties. If one knows these difficulties and remains persevering, he attains good fortune. The difficult task is achieved in the end.


六三:噬腊肉,遇毒;小吝,无咎。

Six in the third place means:

Bites on old dried meat
And strikes on something poisonous.
Slight humiliation. No blame.



Punishment is to be carried out by someone who lacks the power and authority to do so. Therefore the culprits do not submit. The matter at issue is an old one-as symbolized by salted game-and in dealing with it difficulties arise. This old meat is spoiled: by taking up the problem the punisher arouses poisonous hatred against himself, and n this way is put in a somewhat humiliating position. But since punishment was required by the time, he remains free of blame.


六二:噬肤灭鼻,无咎。

Six in the second place means:

Bites through tender meat,
So that his nose disappears.
No blame.



It is easy to discriminate between right and wrong in this case;it is like biting through tender meat. But one encounters ahardened sinner, and, aroused by anger, one goes a little toofar. The disappearance of the nose in the course of the bitesignifies that indignation blots out finer sensibility. However,there is no great harm in this, because the penalty as such is just.


初九:屦校灭趾,无咎。

Nine at the beginning means:

His feet are fastened in the stocks,
So that his toes disappear.
No blame.



If a sentence is imposed the first time a man attempts to do wrong, the penalty is a mild one. Only the toes are put in the stocks. This prevents him from sinning further and thus he becomes free of blame. It is a warning to halt in time on the path of evil.