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Fu Xi Earlier Heaven bagua arrangement
易經
the Hexagrams, Index

In case you like to read a specific hexagram, then use this idex page.

Ancient Chinese coins

易經
het Hexagrammenboek

In case you prefer to ask a question or if you like to read a specific hexagram, then use this idex.






Table 1,

Select a hexagram by combining the trigrams:


Trigrammemindeling
Trigrammemindeling


Table 2,

Select a hexagram from the drop-down list.
The hexagrams are ordered by number:









52. Gen

Keeping Still, Mountain



<
the yellow circle is indicating this line as the governing ruler of the hexagram
上九:敦艮,吉。

Nine at the top means:

Noblehearted keeping still.
Good fortune.




This marks the consummation of the effort to attain tranquillity. One is at rest, not merely in a small, circumscribed way in regard to matters of detail, but one has also a general resignation in regard to life as a whole, and this confers peace and good fortune in relation to every individual matter.
六五:艮其辅,言有序,悔亡。

Six in the fifth place means:

Keeping his jaws still.
The words have order.
Remorse disappears.




A man in a dangerous situation, especially when he is not adequate to it, is inclined to be very free with talk and presumptuous jokes. But injudicious speech easily leads to situations that subsequently give much cause for regret. However, if a man is reserved in speech, his words take ever more definite form, and every occasion for regret vanishes.
六四:艮其身,无咎。

Six in the fourth place means:

Keeping his trunk still.
No blame.




As has been pointed out above in the comment on the Judgment, keeping the back at rest means forgetting the ego. This is the highest stage of rest. Here this stage has not yet been reached: the individual in this instance, though able to keep the ego, with its thoughts and impulses, in a state of rest, is not yet quite liberated from its dominance. Nonetheless, keeping the heart at rest is an important function, leading in the end to the complete elimination of egotistic drives. Even though at this point one does not yet remain free from all the dangers of doubt and unrest, this frame of mind is not a mistake, as it leads ultimately to that other, higher level.
九三:艮其限,列其夤,厉薰心。

Nine in the third place means:

Keeping his hips still.
Making his sacrum stiff.
Dangerous. The heart suffocates.




This refers to enforced quiet. The restless heart is to be subdued by forcible means. But fire when it is smothered changes into acrid smoke that suffocates as it spreads.
Therefore, in exercises in meditation and concentration, one ought not to try to force results. Rather, calmness must develop naturally out of a state of inner composure. If one tries to induce calmness by means of artificial rigidity, meditation will lead to very unwholesome results.
六二:艮其腓,不拯其随,其心不快。

Six in e second place means:

Keeping his calves still.
He cannot rescue him whom he follows.
His heart is not glad.




The leg cannot move independently; it depends on the movement of the body. If a leg is suddenly stopped while the whole body is in vigorous motion, the continuing body movement will make one fall.
The same is true of a man who serves a master stronger than himself. He is swept along, and even though he may himself halt on the path of wrongdoing, he can no longer check the other in his powerful movement. Where the master presses forward, the servant, no matter how good his intentions, cannot save him.
初六:艮其趾,无咎,利永贞。

Six at the beginning means:

Keeping his toes still.
No blame.
Continued perseverance furthers.




Keeping the toes still means halting before one has even begun to move. The beginning is the time of few mistakes. At that time one is still in harmony with primal innocence. Not yet influenced by obscuring interests and desires, one sees things intuitively as they really are. A man who halts at the beginning, so long as he has not yet abandoned the truth, finds the right way. But persisting firmness is needed to keep one from drifting irresolutely.
the Sign of hexagram Keeping Still, Mountain Vis:

the primary trigrams:
   above Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain
   below Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain

the nuclear trigrams:
   above Trigram Zhen , the Arousing, the thunder
   below Trigram Kan , the Abysmal, the water

the enveloping trigrams:
   above Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain
   below Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain

The image of this hexagram is the mountain, the youngest son of heaven and earth. The male principle is at the top because it strives upward by nature; the female principle is below, since the direction of its movement has come to its normal end.
In its application to man, the hexagram turns upon the problem of achieving a quiet heart. It is very difficult to bring quiet to the heart. While Buddhism strives for rest through an ebbing away of all movement in nirvana, the Book of Changes holds that rest is merely a state of polarity that always posits movement as its complement.
Possibly the words of the text embody directions for the practice of yoga.

The sequence:
Things cannot move continuously, one must make them stop. Hence there follows the hexagram of Keeping Still. Keeping Still means stopping.

Miscellaneous notes:
Keeping Still means stopping.

This hexagram is the inverse of the preceding one. It is formed by doubling of the trigram Gen, the youngest son, the mountain. The place of Gen is in the northeast, between Kan in the north and Zhen in the east. It is the mysterious place where all things begin and end, where death and birth pass one into the other. The attribute of the hexagram is keeping still, because the strong lines, whose trend is upward, have attained their goal.
the Judgement for hexagram Keeping Still, Mountain Vis:

艮:艮其背,不获其身,行其庭,不见其人,无咎。

Keeping Still. Keeping his back still
So that he no longer feels his body.
He goes into his courtyard
And does not see his people.
No blame.




True quiet means keeping still when the time has come to keep still, and going forward when the time has come to go forward. In this way rest and movement are in agreement with the demands of the time, and thus there is light in life.
The hexagram signifies the end and the beginning of all movement. The back is named because in the back are located all the nerve fibers that mediate movement. If the movement of these spinal nerves is brought to a standstill, the ego, with its restlessness, disappears as it were. When a man has thus become calm, he may turn to the outside world. He no longer sees in it the struggle and tumult of individual beings, and therefore he has that true peace of mind which is needed for understanding the great laws of the universe and for acting in harmony with them. Whoever acts from these deep levels makes no mistakes.

Commentary on the Decision:

艮,止也。时止则止,时行则行,动静不失其时,其道光明。艮其止,止其所也。上下敌应,不相与也。是以不获其身,行其庭不见其人,无咎也。

Keeping Still means stopping.
When it is time to stop, then stop.
When it is time to advance, then advance.
Thus movement and rest do not miss the right time,
And their course becomes bright and clear.
Keeping his stopping still1 means stopping in his place. Those above and those below are in opposition and have nothing in common. Therefore it is said: “He does not feel his body. He goes into his courtyard and does not see his people. No blame.”




The nature of the hexagram predicates a separation of the upper and the lower trigram. This is indicated also by the divergent movements of the nuclear trigrams, the upper going upward and the lower downward. Keeping still is the meaning of the hexagram itself, movement is the meaning of the nuclear trigrams. Therefore it is explained that movement and stopping, each at the right time, are both features of rest: the one is continuance in a state of movement, the other continuance in a state of rest. The hexagram Gen has an inner brilliance, because the light line at the top is above the two dark ones and so is not darkened; hence the saying: “Their course becomes bright and clear.
”The back is that part of the body which is invisible to oneself; keeping the back still symbolizes making the self still. The lower primary trigram indicates this keeping still of the back, so that one is no longer aware of one’s body, that is, of one’s personality. The upper primary trigram means courtyard. The individual lines of the upper trigram have no relation to the corresponding lines of the lower trigram, hence the upper and the lower trigram turn their backs on each other, as it were. Hence one does not see the other persons in the courtyard.
the Image going with hexagram Keeping Still, Mountain Vis:

兼山,艮;君子以思不出其位。

Mountains standing close together:
The image of Keeping Still.
Thus the superior man
Does not permit his thoughts
To go beyond his situation.




The heart thinks constantly. This cannot be changed, but the movements of the heart - that is, a man's thoughts - should restrict themselves to the immediate situation. All thinking that goes beyond this only makes the heart sore.




the nuclear hexagram:

40. Jie
Deliverance

5
the Sign:

the primary trigrams:
   above Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain
   below Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain

the nuclear trigrams:
   above Trigram Zhen , the Arousing, the thunder
   below Trigram Kan , the Abysmal, the water

the enveloping trigrams:
   above Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain
   below Trigram Gen , Keeping Still, the mountain

The image of this hexagram is the mountain, the youngest son of heaven and earth. The male principle is at the top because it strives upward by nature; the female principle is below, since the direction of its movement has come to its normal end.
In its application to man, the hexagram turns upon the problem of achieving a quiet heart. It is very difficult to bring quiet to the heart. While Buddhism strives for rest through an ebbing away of all movement in nirvana, the Book of Changes holds that rest is merely a state of polarity that always posits movement as its complement.
Possibly the words of the text embody directions for the practice of yoga.

The sequence:
Things cannot move continuously, one must make them stop. Hence there follows the hexagram of Keeping Still. Keeping Still means stopping.

Miscellaneous notes:
Keeping Still means stopping.

This hexagram is the inverse of the preceding one. It is formed by doubling of the trigram Gen, the youngest son, the mountain. The place of Gen is in the northeast, between Kan in the north and Zhen in the east. It is the mysterious place where all things begin and end, where death and birth pass one into the other. The attribute of the hexagram is keeping still, because the strong lines, whose trend is upward, have attained their goal.


the Judgement:

艮:艮其背,不获其身,行其庭,不见其人,无咎。

Keeping Still. Keeping his back still
So that he no longer feels his body.
He goes into his courtyard
And does not see his people.
No blame.




True quiet means keeping still when the time has come to keep still, and going forward when the time has come to go forward. In this way rest and movement are in agreement with the demands of the time, and thus there is light in life.
The hexagram signifies the end and the beginning of all movement. The back is named because in the back are located all the nerve fibers that mediate movement. If the movement of these spinal nerves is brought to a standstill, the ego, with its restlessness, disappears as it were. When a man has thus become calm, he may turn to the outside world. He no longer sees in it the struggle and tumult of individual beings, and therefore he has that true peace of mind which is needed for understanding the great laws of the universe and for acting in harmony with them. Whoever acts from these deep levels makes no mistakes.

Commentary on the Decision:

艮,止也。时止则止,时行则行,动静不失其时,其道光明。艮其止,止其所也。上下敌应,不相与也。是以不获其身,行其庭不见其人,无咎也。

Keeping Still means stopping.
When it is time to stop, then stop.
When it is time to advance, then advance.
Thus movement and rest do not miss the right time,
And their course becomes bright and clear.
Keeping his stopping still1 means stopping in his place. Those above and those below are in opposition and have nothing in common. Therefore it is said: “He does not feel his body. He goes into his courtyard and does not see his people. No blame.”




The nature of the hexagram predicates a separation of the upper and the lower trigram. This is indicated also by the divergent movements of the nuclear trigrams, the upper going upward and the lower downward. Keeping still is the meaning of the hexagram itself, movement is the meaning of the nuclear trigrams. Therefore it is explained that movement and stopping, each at the right time, are both features of rest: the one is continuance in a state of movement, the other continuance in a state of rest. The hexagram Gen has an inner brilliance, because the light line at the top is above the two dark ones and so is not darkened; hence the saying: “Their course becomes bright and clear.
”The back is that part of the body which is invisible to oneself; keeping the back still symbolizes making the self still. The lower primary trigram indicates this keeping still of the back, so that one is no longer aware of one’s body, that is, of one’s personality. The upper primary trigram means courtyard. The individual lines of the upper trigram have no relation to the corresponding lines of the lower trigram, hence the upper and the lower trigram turn their backs on each other, as it were. Hence one does not see the other persons in the courtyard.


the Image:

兼山,艮;君子以思不出其位。

Mountains standing close together:
The image of Keeping Still.
Thus the superior man
Does not permit his thoughts
To go beyond his situation.




The heart thinks constantly. This cannot be changed, but the movements of the heart - that is, a man's thoughts - should restrict themselves to the immediate situation. All thinking that goes beyond this only makes the heart sore.


the Lines:


the yellow circle is indicating this line as the governing ruler of the hexagram
上九:敦艮,吉。

Nine at the top means:

Noblehearted keeping still.
Good fortune.




This marks the consummation of the effort to attain tranquillity. One is at rest, not merely in a small, circumscribed way in regard to matters of detail, but one has also a general resignation in regard to life as a whole, and this confers peace and good fortune in relation to every individual matter.


六五:艮其辅,言有序,悔亡。

Six in the fifth place means:

Keeping his jaws still.
The words have order.
Remorse disappears.




A man in a dangerous situation, especially when he is not adequate to it, is inclined to be very free with talk and presumptuous jokes. But injudicious speech easily leads to situations that subsequently give much cause for regret. However, if a man is reserved in speech, his words take ever more definite form, and every occasion for regret vanishes.


六四:艮其身,无咎。

Six in the fourth place means:

Keeping his trunk still.
No blame.




As has been pointed out above in the comment on the Judgment, keeping the back at rest means forgetting the ego. This is the highest stage of rest. Here this stage has not yet been reached: the individual in this instance, though able to keep the ego, with its thoughts and impulses, in a state of rest, is not yet quite liberated from its dominance. Nonetheless, keeping the heart at rest is an important function, leading in the end to the complete elimination of egotistic drives. Even though at this point one does not yet remain free from all the dangers of doubt and unrest, this frame of mind is not a mistake, as it leads ultimately to that other, higher level.


九三:艮其限,列其夤,厉薰心。

Nine in the third place means:

Keeping his hips still.
Making his sacrum stiff.
Dangerous. The heart suffocates.




This refers to enforced quiet. The restless heart is to be subdued by forcible means. But fire when it is smothered changes into acrid smoke that suffocates as it spreads.
Therefore, in exercises in meditation and concentration, one ought not to try to force results. Rather, calmness must develop naturally out of a state of inner composure. If one tries to induce calmness by means of artificial rigidity, meditation will lead to very unwholesome results.


六二:艮其腓,不拯其随,其心不快。

Six in e second place means:

Keeping his calves still.
He cannot rescue him whom he follows.
His heart is not glad.




The leg cannot move independently; it depends on the movement of the body. If a leg is suddenly stopped while the whole body is in vigorous motion, the continuing body movement will make one fall.
The same is true of a man who serves a master stronger than himself. He is swept along, and even though he may himself halt on the path of wrongdoing, he can no longer check the other in his powerful movement. Where the master presses forward, the servant, no matter how good his intentions, cannot save him.


初六:艮其趾,无咎,利永贞。

Six at the beginning means:

Keeping his toes still.
No blame.
Continued perseverance furthers.




Keeping the toes still means halting before one has even begun to move. The beginning is the time of few mistakes. At that time one is still in harmony with primal innocence. Not yet influenced by obscuring interests and desires, one sees things intuitively as they really are. A man who halts at the beginning, so long as he has not yet abandoned the truth, finds the right way. But persisting firmness is needed to keep one from drifting irresolutely.